OSLO: SONGS OF PEACE

Music can have the power of bringing people together, and numerous Palestinian and Israeli musicians have taken this to heart.

  • Issa Boulos’s album “Being Peace” is a collection of his works spanning two decades of efforts toward harmony between the two nations.

  • “The Peace Song” brings together artists from Israel and Palestine to celebrate love and unity.

  • “Salaam (Od Yavo Shalom Aleinu),” proclaiming “peace will come upon us” in Hebrew and named for the Arabic word for peace, has become an anthem for peace between Israel and Palestine.

LOBBY ENRICHMENT

An effective strategy in audience engagement is creating an experience in the lobby. My time at Marin Theatre Company tasked me with creating dramaturgical displays for each production. From expanding on in-play themes to broader world-connections, I used informational boards, video, and interactive displays to prepare audiences for the performance.

HOW I LEARNED WHAT I LEARNED:

MR. WILSON'S NEIGHBORHOOD

The city of Pittsburgh has changed drastically since August Wilson’s youth in the 1960s. Many of the locations mentioned in How I Learned What I Learned have disappeared due to redevelopment. Follow the strings to explore the Hill District, Downtown Pittsburgh, and Oakland Neighborhood of Wilson’s memory. 

HOW I LEARNED WHAT I LEARNED:

SPOTLIGHT ON AUGUST WILSON

In 1988, Ed Wilson interviewed August Wilson for the program Spotlight. At the time, Wilson was only four plays into his 10-play American Century Cycle and working on The Piano Lesson. In this interview, Wilson discusses:

  • When he first considered himself a writer

  • Founding the Black Horizons Theatre

  • How he created his American Century Cycle

  • The importance of exploring our history

  • How he found his characters’ iconic voices

THE WHO AND THE WHAT:

WOMEN WRITERS SHARING THEIR TESTIMONY

The character of Zarina in Ayad Akhtar’s The Who & The What is an author working on her innovative, yet controversial, novel about the Prophet Muhammad. Zarina follows in the footsteps of these real-life authors.

 

This globe-spanning group of women were all raised in the Islamic faith and their personal experiences inspire their cutting-edge works. Some are internationally lauded while others are provocative and contentious, but all are shaping the public’s relationship with Islam in literature.

Explore the life and impact of Samina Ali (Madras on Rainey Days), Marjane Satrapi (Persepolis), Ayaan Hirsi Ali (Infidel), Firooseh Dumas (Funny in Farsi), Sara Farizan (If You Could Be Mine), Nadia Hashimi (The Pearl That Broke It's Shell), and Azar Nafisi (Ready Lolita in Tehran). 

THE WHO AND THE WHAT:

WOMEN AND THE VEIL

In The Who & The What, Zarina speaks out against the veil as a metaphor for covering up women’s identities. Mahwish and Eli see it differently; Mahwish views the veil as a purifying garment and Eli defends the women at his mosque who wear it proudly. Muslim women can be found on both sides of this heated debate around their choice to wear the veil.

Learn about different forms the veil takes, including the hijab, shayla, al-amira, khimar, chador, niqab, and burka. Read the arguments by Muslim women for and against the veil. Included QR codes lead viewers to TEDx-talks. Novelist and activist Samina Ali discusses the definitions and connotations of the word “hijab” and her view on how the Qur’an prescribes women’s dress. Medical students Narjes Jaafar and Sally Beydoun discuss their own histories with the veil and why one woman chose to wear it and one chose not to.

© 2020 by Emily Rose Cooper